Out of My Head 3: Talent and Craft

Let’s say for the sake of discussion that creativity is to talent as craft is to technique.  One is a subset of the other, each one-half of the writing experience.

Craft is objective.  It’s the external process; rules that can be taught.  It’s scholarly old men over the course of centuries deciding how grammar, punctuation, and story structure work.  Creativity is the internal process; it’s subjective, and comes from a different place altogether.  It’s the art that informs and gives meaning to craft.

Writing then is the act of maintaining the balance between craft and creativity.

I don’t put a lot of stock in talent for its own sake.  You have what you have; either you’re born with it or you’re not.  Talent can be squandered, ignored, thrown away.  Quoting author Steven Barnes: “Attitude, not Aptitude, is the best indicator of future Altitude.”

Relying on talent isn’t enough.  It’s a dead end.  You can’t control talent, but you can control craft.  You need the ability to learn craft, and become good at it.  A perfectly fine story can be written using nothing but technique.  Many authors do.  I don’t recommend it, but that’s just me.  That’s my blue pill.

Creativity is the part of ourselves that wants to play.  Can it be taught?  I honestly don’t know.  Creativity can be nurtured, most definitely; stimulated, encouraged to grow.  The spark is already there, in all of us.  Our child-selves utilized it every day.

Our make-believe worlds were not “make-believe” at all.  They were real.  But then what happens?  We either hold on to our creativity, nurture it, allow it to broaden and mature, or we lose it.  Even worse, we forget it was ever there.

All we really need to do is remember.

Advertisements

Strange New Worlds

Hokey smokes, lots of stuff past and future coming down the pike.  Panels and teaching opportunities, which I surely enjoy.

MisCon 30: Missoula, MT

  • May 28 6:00pm – Exploit Your Inner Fears
  • May 29 12:00pm – Fiction Slam Reading
  • May 29 1:00pm – Not Your Average Short Story Panel
  • May 29 5:00pm – Depicting Emotions in Fiction
  • May 29 6:00pm – Fair Coin
  • May 30 11:00am – Writing Part-Time

Write in the Harbor 2016: Tacoma Community College; Gig Harbor, WA

  • Nov 5 9:30am – The Hero’s Journey
  • Nov 5 11:30am – Science Fiction: Worldbuilding
  • Nov 5 3:00pm – Writing Short Fiction

OryCon 38: Portland, OR

  • Nov 18-20  Programming schedule pending to be determined

Out of My Head 2: The Basics

In a world where you can be anything, be yourself.

Don’t waste time and effort trying to be the writer-artiste, hiding behind a carefully crafted pseudonym, persona, or avatar.  Don’t covet celebrity before it’s deserved.  You have to earn that.  Use your precious energy to write.  It’s never too late to be who you really are.

Teachers say “write what you know”.  I don’t really believe that’s true, particularly not in genre fiction.  No one knows what an AI will do when it’s plugged in for the first time.  No one knows about FTL spacecraft, or wormholes to other galaxies, or elves, or dragons, or magic in urban settings, or plucky young heroines in YA dystopias.  But we write about them anyway.  We’re drawn to the things that appeal to us, the ones that nourish our spirit.  So write them.  Don’t get lost in what you know.  Focus on what makes you happy.  Write what you love.

The trick is to learn from real writers.

Approach with caution the Creative Writing professor who’s never published any fiction herself.  The buddy who’s full of great ideas and characters and plot twists but has never done anything with them.  The Best Friend Forever who’s loved everything you have ever written and can’t wait for you to write more.  Or the guy who covets the writer’s lifestyle without having earned it.  You know him.  He hangs out with writers, attends writer events, even fawns his way onto panels so that he can talk to you about writing.  But he hasn’t paid his dues.  He hasn’t sold anything of his own.  These people can’t help you.  None of them can help you.  You have to let all of that go if you want to move forward.

Needing a degree in order to write is bullshit.  Needing an advanced degree in order to write is fucking bullshit.

You can’t learn how to write by reading a book about it, or by listening to someone talk.  (When’s the last time anyone learned to swim without actually getting in the water?)  You can only learn by doing.

Writing is a privilege, not an entitlement.

 

Goal Structuring

To become a success in anything, you have to have goals.  You have to know what you want, stated as clearly and honestly as possible.

If you feel you aren’t achieving your goals as a writer, examine your behavior.  How are you organizing your time?  If you want to be published, are you writing consistently?  Sending those stories out?  It doesn’t matter what your goals are, only that you understand them and do something about it.

Balance goals with the real world.  I have a day job.  That’s 8, 9, 10 hours a day that require my focus.  I’m married; my wife and I together share the responsibility to nurture and grow that relationship.  I have two sons; they’re adults now but for the longest time they weren’t.  And I own a home; it’s my job to keep it in good repair, take out the trash, make sure the lawn is mowed.  Where my writing time comes from is the same bucket that I use for television, reading, movies, Internet, and social media.  Everything has a trade-off.  This is mine.

What goal are you working on right now?  What story are you writing?  Did you finish it?  If not, what stopped you?  What resources do you need to get back on track?

 

I Want…

A question that’s not really asked in Creative Writing class is what kind of writer do you want to be?  (We’re not talking about genre.)  There are essentially five kinds of writer in today’s world, each with a trajectory and set of requirements that are very different from the others.  So ask yourself–what do I really want?  I want to be a…

  • Writer
  • Published writer
  • Published writer who gets paid
  • Published writer who gets paid money
  • Published writer who gets paid a professional wage

Each path is tied uniquely to its goal.  They are not easily interchangeable.  The path to becoming a Published Writer will not lead you to a Published Writer Who Gets Paid Money.  The markets are very, very different.  Choose your goals wisely and with careful thought.

 

Rituals of Productivity

Everyone’s got them.  “I can only write at night.  I need a mug of herbal tea with me at all times.  Only the most up to date software for my laptop, please.”  All of which is fine.  The point is not to be dependent on your rituals or tools.  It becomes an easy excuse not to write if you don’t have them at the ready.  Learn to do without.  Minimalism is a good thing.

When I was in England several years back I visited Charles Dickens’ house.  It’s a museum now, still furnished as when he lived there.  What impressed me the most was his desk.  It’s not really a desk at all; it’s a small table the size and shape of a dinner tray, with long spindly legs mounted on tiny wheels.  Dickens would roll it from room to room when he wrote, wherever the mood struck him and the light was best.  He didn’t need a grand, impressive piece of furniture that bellowed “I Am a Writer!” when he worked.  He just needed to work.

 

Overcoming Obstacles

Never surrender.  Failure is when you don’t get back up again.

Criticism of your work is not a personal attack.

Lack of control is self-imposed.

Don’t start anything unless you have a profound commitment to finish it.  If you don’t, how will you know if your story is any good?  You can’t revise it, can’t market it, can’t sell it.  The discipline of being a writer isn’t having ideas, it’s following them through to the end.

Conquer fear – “I’m afraid I can’t get what’s in my head onto the page.”  Recognize FEAR for what it is–a learning tool, one more step along the many paths to wisdom.  Which path you take is up to you.

  • Positive response: False Evidence that Appears Real
  • Negative response: Fuck Everything and Run

Writer’s Block – I’ve seen articles listing up to a dozen or so different types of writer’s block, describing each in detail to help you assign your symptoms to the correct category.  That’s much too complicated.  You need that energy to fix the problem at hand.  Here’s the simple definition: writer’s block is a confusion of the flow and edit states.  The writer will edit up front as he goes, with each sentence, and the flow is stymied.  Flow and edit are processed differently in the human brain, as are belief and doubt.  Just get the words on paper.  Less than marvelous is okay.  You can make them pretty later.

Every word you type will help you.

 

Extracting Outcomes

Don’t post your finished story online, no matter how much you want to.  Not on your website, not on your blog.  Not if you want to sell it.  Why would a publisher pay you for a story that you’ve already offered up to the world for free?

A publisher isn’t going to buy your book if he doesn’t think it will make him any money.  It’s not about good.  It’s about the money.

There is no such thing as “professional quality”.  There’s a whole lot of garbage out there that was produced professionally.  The only criterion that determines if your work is professional is whether or not you’re paid a professional wage.  That’s it.

 

Not-So-Random Observations

Quit looking for the magic, and do the work.

The most honest validation you will ever receive for your work is a paycheck.

Blow your pipes out.  Get rid of the media stuff built up inside.  You’ll never find your own voice otherwise.

Don’t self-critique while writing.

Treat writing like the profession it is.  Build a portfolio.  Amass finished work.  No one wants to see incomplete material.  What is your reputation at any given moment?  Be the good guy.  Learn to meet deadlines.  Work ethic is just as important as talent.  Put yourself out there.  Market your work.  If you don’t believe in yourself, who will?

“I write for the fans.”  This is bullshit.  It’s pandering.  Don’t pimp out your inner child.  Write for you.

Writing is not important by itself.  It’s only important if it makes a difference.  So make a difference.

 

 

Norwescon 39

Lots of excitement and energy this year as Norwescon 39 quickly approaches.  Programming has done an exceptional job in promoting diversity in subject matter while welcoming new panelists to share the spotlight alongside returning favorites.  Writing Track alone has a higher percentage of pros who are new to Norwescon than have participated in a long while.  I’m looking forward to having a drink or few with old friends after much too long an absence, as well as the opportunity to remedy those relationships that need mending.  Here is my schedule per the program guide for March 24-27, 2016:

Mar 24, 3PM – “Your Story is a Problem, and That’s Good”.  A story is about a problem.  Your hero has to solve that problem.  How do you balance the two?  Listen as our pros share how they scale their crises and heroes with a fit that’s dramatically plausible and satisfying.

Mar 24, 6PM – “Patterns of Success, Patterns of Failure”.  Rituals of productivity: every writer has them.  The things we think we need in order to be creative.  Share with our panelists what works, what does not, and what might be outright destructive.

Mar 24, 8PM – “How a Writers Workshop Changed My Life”.  Writers workshops can be positive forums for young creativity in development.  But for some they can lead to false expectations and disappointment.  Hear panelists share their experiences in writers workshops, and perhaps share your own as well.

Mar 25, 2PM – Writers Workshop: Tracy Durnell

Mar 25, 4PM – “The Art of Writing It Again”.  Your editor orders a major rewrite of your masterpiece.  How exactly do you go about doing it?  Discuss with our panelists how to best cope with revision while still keeping true to the story you wanted to tell in the first place.

Mar 25, 6PM – “Writing is a Long Con”.  Most overnight successes take ten years.  You have to think big picture, write for the long haul, and understand it’s a long game.  Pros will talk about strategizing long-term and how to give yourself every advantage for enduring success.

Mar 26, 10AM – Writers Workshop: Shweta Sundararajan

Mar 26, 12PM – ” Fundamentals of Worldbuilding”.  Story arises from what your characters want and need, not from where they live.  Learn from our panel of worldbuilders how your planet, kingdom, or landscape can inform the characters and how to keep the story apace without overwhelming the narrative with geographic or cultural details.

Mar 26, 2PM – Autograph Session 1

Mar 26, 7PM – “Worldbuilding: Gods, Religion, and Mythos”.  What makes for a compelling mythos?  How do characters correctly or mistakenly address these aspects in their narrative?  Join our pros as they discuss the nuances of balancing these three elements in a fantasy setting.

Mar 26, 830PM – Reading: “Evensong, Having been Answered”

Mar 27, 2PM – “Worldbuilding: Alien Means Different”.  Speculative fiction is filled with alien societies and characters based on all-too-human quirks and cultural traits.  A convenient shortcut, or creatively lazy?  Discuss how writers build worlds that are truly alien yet are still relatable to readers.

I Swear Our House Wasn’t a Fixer-Upper When We Bought It

A wee two bedroom mid-century, move-in ready.  That’s what it was, I swear.  Two years later now and I’m not so sure.

We just finished a full ceiling makeover, for no other reason than we didn’t like the acoustic popcorn that was there originally.  Seal the rooms; scrape the popcorn; haul out the debris; add new beams because they look nice; patch, mud, and sand; prime and paint.

Ah, but heed well, padawan.  There’s more.

Prior to the ceiling project, we (counting backwards) replaced the mailbox; installed new front and back doors, a new window in the bathroom, and cabinets in the laundry room; dug a fire pit in the front yard (to match the one in the back); removed a wood-burning stove and patched the hole where the stove pipe exited the roof; built a shed; installed exterior electrics and lighting; ripped out the old landscaping (which included a laurel hedge that occupied the same length, width, and height as the Great Wall of China); and planted forty-three new trees and assorted varieties of ground cover to replace the Great Wall of China.

In a house that wasn’t a fixer-upper.

I feel like the guy on that insurance commercial: “I’m never buying another house.”

Out of My Head: Advice vs Rules

People wanting to write are hungry for advice.  (Myself, I was starving.)  Everyone wants the magic bullet, the password, the secret handshake, the keys to the kingdom.  The secret of it all is that there is no secret, only lots of hard work.   Anything else is misdirection.

It’s the idea of what’s right that can trap people, everything that is couched as “you should…” or “a pro always…”  They’re all trying to entice  you with the red pill.  “Buy my book!  Attend my seminar!  Sign up for my workshop!”  And that’s dangerous.  With apologies to The Matrix, there is no red pill, no One True Path.  There are only blue pills.  Thousands of them.  Each one a writer with opinions to sell, and none of them quantifiably objective.

Robert Heinlein’s advice on the matter was simple and straightforward:

  • Write
  • Finish what you write
  • Put it in the mail
  • Keep it in the mail until it sells
  • Never revise except to editorial request

Author Jay Lake posited that the only universally true advice for writers is “Write more”.  Everything else falls into the trap of individualized process.  What one writer passionately believes could be nonsensical or even destructive to another writer.

The trick with advice is sorting out how to apply it.

Lake again: We’re all Viktor Frankenstein, sewing body parts in the basement.  (I love that imagery!)  There isn’t a right way, there’s just your way.  And my way.  And anyone else’s way.

The difference between Rules and Advice is an easy one: Writing Rules are spelling, punctuation, grammar, manuscript format, the difference between nouns and verbs.  They’re what we learned in English class.  We collectively agree to them so as to make the process of reading and writing coherent.

Advice is: “don’t begin your story until you have a firm understanding of character, setting, and problem.”  That’s an opinion, nothing more.  Take or ignore advice as you wish.  Writing is a profoundly idiosyncratic business.

The point?  Try not to read how-to books and think “I’m doing it wrong.”  If something you read strikes you as interesting or worthwhile, go for it.  Every writer has to discover for themselves how to get it right.

So before you go running down to the dealer’s room, or to the store, or pay lots of money for workshops or seminars or online classes looking for that one perfect book about writing, the one that’s tailor made to suit your unique voice and strengths…  Stop.  That book isn’t going to be there.  It doesn’t exist.  You haven’t written it yet.

All of that being said, here are my own rules to live and write by.  Relax, there are only two:

Rule #1: Be honest (don’t try to be clever).

Being clever is calling attention to yourself.  You’re letting the words be more important than what you want to say.  Your job as the writer is to be invisible.  Declaring your presence with overwrought prose is not being invisible.

Rule #2: Steal from the best.

Learn from those who have actually done what you want to accomplish yourself.  Which authors first inspired you to take up pen and paper?  Who rocks your world, and how do they do it?  Embrace the writers who resonate with you most and incorporate them into your own work.  Try to sound like them.  Your unique voice will separate itself out as your skills and confidence grow, built upon a successful foundation of those who came before you.

Ultimately, there’s only one thing to remember: No one has ever written a perfect book.  But you keep trying.  That’s what it’s all about.

 

dean-wells.com

Back when this website was first launched, there were no variations of my name available with which to register the domain.  I just figured it would be easier for people to find.  By default I chose one of my character’s names instead.  (It was actually his title, but there you go.)  So imagine my surprise when “Dean Wells with a dash in the middle” opened up.  I claimed it a moment later.

So here we are, darkapostle.net is now dean-wells.com, and I’m happy to have you all aboard.  Exciting times are ahead!